Archive for March, 2011

Job o’ the Day: Show Me an Entry-Level Legal Services Attorney Listing

¿Habla usted Español?

Legal Aid of Western Missouri’s downtown Kansas City office has an immediate opening for a full-time Spanish-speaking attorney for our Protecting Immigrant Families (PIF) Project.

Job duties include maintaining a caseload of victims of domestic violence, representing clients to obtain Full Orders of Protection and other remedies under the Adult Abuse Act, including custody, child support and return of property.  The attorney will explain legal rights and provide education in self-advocacy.  The attorney will do out-reach work with shelters and victim service organizations, inform providers about legal issues regarding domestic violence, and participate in regional planning council for domestic violence and prevention

For more details, view the full listing on PSLawNet  (login required).

Add to FacebookAdd to DiggAdd to Del.icio.usAdd to StumbleuponAdd to RedditAdd to BlinklistAdd to TwitterAdd to TechnoratiAdd to Yahoo BuzzAdd to Newsvine

Leave a Comment

Job o’ the Day: Do You Love Animals and Nonprofit Corporate Governance?…

…because those two affinities are peas in a pod.  The World Wildlife Fund (WWF), the global conservation organization, seeks an attorney with excellent research, analysis, and communication skills to serve as Assistant General Counsel. The attorney will provide advice on legal requirements and best practices relating to overall operations, with a particular emphasis on outreach and fundraising activities.

The position’s based in DC.  To learn more, view the listing on PSLawNet (login required).

Application deadline: 4/08/11. 

Add to FacebookAdd to DiggAdd to Del.icio.usAdd to StumbleuponAdd to RedditAdd to BlinklistAdd to TwitterAdd to TechnoratiAdd to Yahoo BuzzAdd to Newsvine

Leave a Comment

U. of Chicago Law’s Kickarse New LRAP Program

Nice skyline, Chicago. Cubs still stink.

The PSLawNet Blog intended to cover this announcement out of the Windy City several days ago, but we succumbed to the flu last week.  So, better late than never…

From a March 11 announcement:

The University of Chicago Law School today announced a complete redesign of its Loan Repayment Assistance Program (LRAP), making it the most generous program of its kind. The three most important changes to the program are that it now offers the opportunity for any graduate staying in public interest for ten years to go to law school for free, that all graduates who serve as judicial clerks will be eligible for the program, and that a generous $80,000 salary cap will make the program more inclusive than ever.

Hah – the law school’s communications department chose to refer to the new LRAP program as “dramatic.”  We’ve never thought of LRAPs as involving much drama.  That said, we describe the program as “kickarse,” so perhaps we shouldn’t appoint ourselves the modifier police.

We digress.  Here’s a voice of approval of Chicago Law’s new LRAP, emanating from North-side rival Northwestern Law.  Northwestern adjunct professor Steven Harper, an observer of legal industry goings-on, writes in The American Lawyer:

When law schools get it wrong, they deserve the scorn that comes with a public spotlight. When they get it right, they should bask in its warm glow. The University of Chicago Law School recently got it right. Really right.

A single line from the school’s website description says it all: “This means that a graduate who engages in qualifying work for ten years, earns less than the salary cap, and maintains enrollment in the federal Income-Based Repayment Program, will receive a FREE University of Chicago Law School education!

“Qualifying work” is public interest broadly defined as “the full-time practice of law, or in a position normally requiring a law degree, in a nonprofit organization or government office, other than legal academia.” It includes judicial clerkships.

The “salary cap” is $80,000 and doesn’t include spousal income. That combination seems to beat Harvard, Yale and Stanford. (Caveat: The differences across school programs can be significant and prospective students should consider their own circumstances, run the numbers, and determine which one produces the best individual result.)

Huzzah, U. of Chicago!

Add to FacebookAdd to DiggAdd to Del.icio.usAdd to StumbleuponAdd to RedditAdd to BlinklistAdd to TwitterAdd to TechnoratiAdd to Yahoo BuzzAdd to Newsvine

Leave a Comment

Job O’ the Day: Wanna Save the Children?

Save the Children’s DC office is hiring an Associate Director of Public Policy and Advocacy who will strengthen and increase the impact of agency policy and advocacy related to Livelihoods, Hunger and Malnutrition, and Education and Early Childhood Development.

The Associate Director will:

  • Provide strategic vision and leadership;
  • Design and lead implementation of policy and advocacy strategies for these sectors which include legislative strategies;
  • Increase support in Congress and with other policy makers;
  • Collaborate closely with Save the Children departments to develop key messages;
  • Establish and maintain strong external relationships with key coalitions and non-governmental organizations;
  • Conduct policy research and analysis for contribution to publications in connection with this advocacy;
  • Plan and coordinate briefings or other events on Capitol Hill;
  • Coordinate with other Save the Children International (SCI) hunger and education advocates;
  • Support Save the Children’s annual Advocacy Day and support Save the Children’s efforts to build capacity in Public Policy and Advocacy

To learn more, view the listing on PSLawNet (login required).

Add to FacebookAdd to DiggAdd to Del.icio.usAdd to StumbleuponAdd to RedditAdd to BlinklistAdd to TwitterAdd to TechnoratiAdd to Yahoo BuzzAdd to Newsvine

Leave a Comment

Cavalier with the Cash! Over $375,000 in Public Interest Summer Grants at UVA Law

The PSLawNet blog financed his summer public interest internships by relying on an $8/hour Federal Work Study award.  And eating a lot of peanut butter.  For lunch and dinner.  Sometimes breakfast.  So we’re generally happy, but also a little jealous, to learn about the recent summer grant awards that UVA Law’s Public Interest Law Association has bestowed on 1Ls and 2Ls.  They won’t be rich by law-firm summer associate standards, but they will make ends meet this summer.

From the Virginia Law Weekly:

Public Interest Law Association (PILA) has awarded over $377,500 in the form of eighty-one fellowships to law students who will work in public interest positions during the summer of 2011. This year’s distribution included forty-four 1L and thirty-seven 2L summer grants.First-year students receive $3,500 and second-year students receive $6,000 to supplement the costs of taking a public interest position.

Good stuff, PILA!  The organization is able to raise this kind of cash through a diverse array of funding sources (which is a wise set-up):

Fellowships are funded through the Law School Foundation, the Dean’s Office, the Law & Public Service Program, and student, faculty and community sponsors. This year, PILA’s own fundraising events netted $88,000 — an increase from the $82,000 raised in the 2009-10 calendar year.

Add to FacebookAdd to DiggAdd to Del.icio.usAdd to StumbleuponAdd to RedditAdd to BlinklistAdd to TwitterAdd to TechnoratiAdd to Yahoo BuzzAdd to Newsvine

Leave a Comment

Job O’ the Day: Immigration Law in the Big Apple

A new, daily feature on the PSLawNet Blog. We’ll pull a job listing from PSLawNet’s database and feature it here.

Today, we feature a Staff Attorney opening at Sanctuary for Families’ Immigration Intervention Project.

The Staff Attorney is an integral part of Sanctuary for Families’ Immigration Intervention Project, a legal services project that represents over 1,000 victims of domestic violence each year in immigration matters. Representation is provided in-house, as well as through the mentoring of volunteer attorneys. In addition, through trainings and participating in the immigration and domestic violence advocacy communities of New York, the Staff Attorney educates the public, the social service and law enforcement communities, and politicians about issues pertinent to immigrant victims of domestic violence…

The application deadline is April 1.  No foolin’.  To view the full job listing, log in to PSLawNet.

Add to FacebookAdd to DiggAdd to Del.icio.usAdd to StumbleuponAdd to RedditAdd to BlinklistAdd to TwitterAdd to TechnoratiAdd to Yahoo BuzzAdd to Newsvine

Leave a Comment

Cash for Convictions in Colorado: Is a Prosecutor Giving Bonuses For High Conviction Rates? (And Is Anything Wrong with That?)

Here’s an interesting story out of Aurora, Colorado from Denver-based boobtube station KUSA.  A public defender has filed a motion to have a special prosecutor assigned in a case because the local district attorney may have a policy of giving financial bonuses to attorneys with high conviction rates.

The potential problem here is laid out by a local attorney (not the public defender who filed the motion):   

Aurora attorney Derek Cole says giving money to prosecutors who had high conviction rates at trial could encourage them to take cases to trial and not offer plea bargains.

“If I am representing somebody in a trial and there is an extraneous factor that I don’t know, we may get some resistance from the district attorney and it may be because they want a bonus and it’s just not acceptable,” Cole said. “It upsets the balance.”

But, the District Attorney, Carol Chambers, says that’s not what’s going on:

“We have not done anything unethical. We do not give people money for convicting people. That is distorted and it is untrue.”

Chambers went on to note that trial victories was only one factor in determining bonuses.  The office gave out almost $165K in bonuses in 2010, but it’s discontinued the practice as a result of budget cuts.

It seems to us that if bonuses were given based upon a number of factors, one of which was success at trial, that’s cool.  But if bonuses were tied solely or primarily to conviction rates, that could be a problem.  The story doesn’t say what bonus amounts were awarded to attorneys, so it’s hard to know how much incentive a bonus might be for a prosecutor.

PSLawNet Blog Verdict: we need more facts.  But we figured we’d post because it raises an interesting ethics question.

Add to FacebookAdd to DiggAdd to Del.icio.usAdd to StumbleuponAdd to RedditAdd to BlinklistAdd to TwitterAdd to TechnoratiAdd to Yahoo BuzzAdd to Newsvine

Leave a Comment

Older Posts »